How to Merge Two LinkedIn Accounts to Avoid LinkedIn Jail

How to Merge or Delete Your Extra LinkedIn Profile

Do you have more than one LinkedIn Profile? If so, you’re breaking LinkedIn’s End User Agreement and could face time in “LinkedIn Jail.” You will want to learn how to merge two LinkedIn accounts.

Another thing is, when a prospect searches for you, and two profiles show up, it can be very confusing for them. Which one should they open? Which one represents the BEST you? You can’t control that, so it’s better just to have one profile.

In other words, your accounts could get shut down! Watch the video below for more information about this.

In a previous video, I explained how to represent more than one business or area of expertise on LinkedIn. If you currently have more than one account, you’ll want to eliminate the extra one as soon as possible. Find out how to analyze your social media performance, keep your data and become a rule-abiding LinkedIn user.

Avoid LinkedIn Jail by deleting your extra #LinkedIn Profile NOW! Here is @LinkedInExpert to show us how. #SellingwithLinkedIn #LinkedInTips #SocialSellingClick To Tweet

LinkedIn Profile Tips to Delete or Merge a Second Account in 8 Easy Steps

When there’s more than one personal profile with your name on it, you’re not only breaking LinkedIn’s rules but likely confusing your prospects, too. There’s no way for you to direct them to the appropriate profile when they’re searching your name.

Viveka points out, “If you have more than one account on LinkedIn, there are tools in place that will help you to merge or delete the extra accounts.” Here’s the process:

Step 1: Save BOTH accounts as a PDF. You can do this from the More button on your Profile.

Step 2: Download the data from both accounts (if you have access to both) in the Accounts > Settings and Privacy Section. You’ll find it under Data Privacy.

If you know and have access to the email address you created your “bad” or duplicate account with, continue here:

Step 3: Find the email and password to your “bad” account.  If you still have access to the email address you created it with, you can always reset your password if needed.

Step 4: In Settings and Privacy, under “Account preferences” scroll down to “Merge accounts” in the Account Management section.

Step 5:  Make sure you are in your “good” account and add the sign-in information for your “bad” or duplicate account that you want to merge.

Step 6: If you want to close your account, sign into the “bad” or duplicate account and go to Accounts. Go to the bottom of the page and click “Close Account.”

If you can’t remember your email password and are unable to access it, take the following steps:

Step 3: Find the account in a LinkedIn Search.

Step 4: Copy the URL.

Step 5: Go to the Help section and scroll down to Contact Us. Next, click on “Get help from us”. When your help options appear, choose “Other” and then type in “Close Account.” LinkedIn will provide some additional links, but just go to the bottom option to “Create a support ticket.”

Step 6: Let LinkedIn know you have two accounts and want to delete or merge them, but you no longer have access to the email address you created the duplicate account with.

Step 7: Share the URL from the bad account so they don’t take action on the wrong one!

Step 8: Wait a few days to hear back from LinkedIn’s support team.

Here are 8 Easy Steps to delete or merge a second account on #LinkedIn. #SocialSelling #DigitalSelling #LinkedInTips @linkedinexpertClick To Tweet

If you need additional help, you can always reach out to LinkedIn’s support team under their Help section. Abiding by LinkedIn’s rules is critical. Having a restricted account, even temporarily, is not something you want to deal with.

Make sure you check out our LinkedIn training program that teaches B2B sales professionals how to create more sales conversations with qualified buyers.

The Ultimate Guide to LinkedIn Profiles for Sales Professionals

Viveka von Rosen

Viveka von Rosen is a co-founder and the CVO (Chief Visibility Officer) of Vengreso. Known internationally as the “LinkedIn Expert”, she is the author of the best-selling “LinkedIn Marketing: An Hour a Day” and “LinkedIn: 101 Ways to Rock Your Personal Brand!” As a contributing “expert” to LinkedIn’s official Sales and Marketing blogs and their “Sophisticated Marketer’s” Guides, she is often called on to contribute to publications like Fast Company, Forbes, Money, Entrepreneur, The Social Media Examiner, etc. Viveka takes the LinkedIn experience she has perfected over the past 10+ years and transforms it into engaging and informational training (having provided over 100K+ people) with the tools and strategies they need to succeed on LinkedIn.

Comments
  • Matt Somers

    Thanks for this really useful article. What happens if you have the same connection on the two LinkedIn accounts. EG. John Smith, CEO of Smith Inc is a connection on both my “good” and “bad” LinkedIn accounts. Would he receive some kind of notification that one account has closed by that the other remains open?

  • Hey Matt – No – not notification. When he looked you up on Linkedin only the “good” account would be visible/available/left… Sometimes folks will email their network to let them know they have a new account – but that can be time-consuming and I don’t think necessary…

  • Aishik Roy Chaudhury

    What happens to the LinkedIn assessments you have passed?

  • Thanks Viveka. I had been wanting to remove an early linked in profile. You outline was simple to follow and made my account management easy.

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